Photo credit: Orlando Ridout V , 1987

Property Name: Mannheim
Date Listed: 9/25/1979
Inventory No.: WA-II-0164
Location: Sanmar Road, Boonsboro, Washington County

Description: This group of buildings, formerly associated with a grist and saw milling business, is located on the southeast side of Sanmar Road, just south of Mt. Lena. The dwelling is constructed on a slope and faces east. The house is a 3-bay structure built of roughly coursed local limestone. It is one story high at the front elevation, but because it is built into a bank, the west elevation is a full two stories. No decorative work is associated with the masonry. A one-story stone kitchen wing extends to the south. Windows on the east and west façades have 9/6 sash and modern louvered shutters. The main entrance is in the center bay of the east façade, and is topped by a four-light transom. It has six raised panels backed with vertical planks and held to the frame with long strap hinges. The west elevation also has a ground-floor central entrance, and the second floor formerly held a central entrance opposite the main entrance. This has been replaced with a window. Surviving late 19th century photographs show this former entrance opening onto a small balustraded deck which also served as a roof over the door below. A three-bay one-story porch with elaborate turned posts and scroll-sawn brackets now covers the first floor of the west façade. A course of cornice molding finishes the eaves of the house, and brick chimneys are located inside each gable end. A late 20th century stone addition was constructed to complement the original house. Northeast of the house is a large frame bank barn on fieldstone foundations. A small board-and-batten service kitchen or wash house is located just southeast of the house. A sawmill is said to have been located about 100 yards east of the house, and a large 2 1/2-story grist mill was located west of the dwelling, along Sanmar Road.

Significance: The complex of structures on the "Resurvey on Manheim" property consists of a stone house, a frame bank barn, and related outbuildings. At one time it also included a grist mill and saw mill. The buildings have contributed much to the agriculture, commerce, and industry in Washington County. As a grist milling complex, these buildings served the local agricultural community. The grist mill offered an opportunity for nearby farmers to process grain into more marketable flour and meal. Grist milling was a major industry in Washington County where grain was an important crop and water power was readily available. The house, which appears to have been built during the last decade of the 18th century or the early years of the 19th century, displays regional characteristics of the period as well as some unusual architectural features. Much of its original interior woodwork remains intact, even retaining the original paint in some rooms. The new wing on the house is an example of the compatible contemporary additions that can be made to such vernacular stone farmhouses. The mill on this property, known as "Murray's Mill," was in operation through the 19th century.




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