Photo credit: David C. Hodge , Undated Photo

Property Name: Griffith House
Date Listed: 11/14/1978
Inventory No.: HA-163
Location: 1120, Old Philadelphia Road (MD 7), Aberdeen, Harford County

Description: Dating from the 18th century, the Wright House (Griffith House) is a frame house measuring approximately 18 1/2 by 38 feet, three bays in length, one room in depth, 1 1/2 stories in height, with a gambrel roof. Shed-roofed porches extend across east long (east and west) façade. A one-story shed-roofed wing stands against the north end. Exterior walls are covered with asbestos shingles. The porches are enclosed largely with windows. The northerly half of the west porch has been extended to form another room. Porch ceilings are covered with random-width beaded boards indicating the porches to be early if not original to the house. A brick chimney with two flues rises internally at the south end of the house, its first story formerly exposed, nearly flush with the siding. Another brick chimney rises externally against the north gable, its first story exposed within the shed-roofed wing at that end. Two shed-roofed dormers, each with 6/6 sash, are in both the east and west roofs. Principal entrances are in the middle bay of the east and west façades, slightly south of center, and a large 6/6 window is in each of the flanking bays, except for the west façade's north bay where a door gives access to the room which has replaced the porch there. The east door is in place but the west door has been removed and stored elsewhere on the premises. The east door is of six fully raised panels, lined internally with vertical beaded boards fastened to the stiles and rails of the paneled door with rose-headed wrought nails. In the south gable a six-light casement lights the stairwell in the second story, in the southeast corner of the house. A door is in the eat end of the north wing and two 6/6 windows are in its north side.

Significance: The Wright House was the dwelling of a moderately successful 18th century farmer or planter. Its frame construction, gambrel roof, porches, and interior detailing are all typical of Maryland's 18th century tidewater architecture. While the Wright House has seen some superficial change, most of its details remain, even if hidden by modern finishes, and as the house is untouched by the modern restorer, its details of all periods are wholly honest, identifiable, and believable.




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