Photo credit: MHT File Photo , Undated Photo

Property Name: Farm Content
Date Listed: 6/20/1975
Inventory No.: CARR-24
Location: 1221, Old New Windsor Pike (MD 852), Westminster, Carroll County

Description: Farm Content is situated on the south side of Old New Windsor Pike, 1/2 mile west of MD 31, three miles south of Westminster. The house is of brick construction, five bays wide at the principal façade and two stories high beneath a gable roof. On three sides of the house, east, west, and north, the brick walls are laid in Flemish bond, while the south end is laid in common bond. On all elevations the mortar joints are penciled in white. The centered entrance on the principal façade was enlarged in about the mid 19th century and the opening now frames a paneled double door and transom. Each of the two windows flanking both sides of the door are of 6/6 pane sash. Across the second floor level and positioned directly over those openings below are five windows, also of 6/6 lights each. All of the windows have flat arches of splayed stretcher bricks and louvered blinds. In the late 19th or early 20th century the existing one-story farm porch with six square tapered columns was built against this elevation. On both the front and rear sides are stepped brick eave cornices with one course of brick laid on the diagonal in sawtooth fashion. On both ends of the house the gable walls rise above the roof line to form low parapets. Single flush gable chimneys stand at each end of the roof ridge and on the outside wall of the north chimney there is a marble date plaque which reads "D R S 1795". On the rear elevation of the house, towards the south end, stands a two-story brick wing with a recessed porch on its north side. This addition, which has a later shed-roofed addition on its south side, incorporates into its plan a formerly detached one-story kitchen contemporary to the main block in its date of construction.

Significance: Farm Content is one of the finest examples of rural Federal architecture in Carroll County, and as the home of David Shriver, progenitor of the Shriver family in Maryland, it is recognized as a local historic landmark. Despite minor alterations and the addition of a large rear wing, the house retains sufficient original detail to establish it as a regionally significant example of its particular form. Of the dependencies the privy is the most noteworthy. Since privies were usually the least adaptable they have nearly completely disappeared and their presence among surviving collections of domestic dependencies is becoming increasingly rare.




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