Photo credit: Traceries , 03/1998

Property Name: Peggy Stewart House
Date Listed: 11/7/1973
Inventory No.: AA-724
Location: 207, Hanover Street, Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Description: Originally, the house was a 2-story gable-roofed brick structure with flush chimneys typical of the period in Annapolis. In 1896-1897, the gable roof was replaced by the present hipped roof, a balustrade was added at the ridge, gable-roofed dormers were constructed, and the chimneys were rebuilt to conform with the changed roofline. As it stands today, the house is a 2 1/2-story, 5-bay wide brick structure, set facing northwest upon a stone and brick foundation, and covered with a hipped roof. The front and rear walls are laid in header bond, while the end walls feature English bond. A watertable is found on all elevations of the house, while a three-brick-wide stringcourse extends across just the front and rear walls. The windows feature gauged flat and segmental-arched openings. A late-19th century rear wing and mid- to late-20th century addition replace an earlier one-story wing. The first floor of the front facade consists of a central entry and its corresponding restored entry porch flanked by two 9/9 windows with segmental-arched, gauged brick lintels and stone sills. The open pedimented entry porch, with Tuscan columns and pilasters, is a product of an early-20th century restoration. A square baluster railing spans the bays between the porch columns and the pilasters. The 8-panel door with 4-light transom is set deep into the brick wall. The second story consists of five 12/12 windows with soldier-course brick lintels and stone sills. The central window is smaller than the others, but occupies a similar-sized opening. Above the second story is a wide, unadorned frieze and wide eaves supporting the hip roof. The front slope of which features two wide 6/6 pedimented dormers added during the 1896-97 remodeling.

Significance: The Peggy Stewart House, the Georgian-style dwelling at 207 Hanover Street, was constructed in the period between 1761 and 1764 for Thomas Rutland as rental property. During the latter part of the 18th century, the dwelling was owned by such prominent statesmen as Thomas Stone (signer of the Declaration of Independence) and Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer (signer of the 1787 Constitution). In 1772, the property was owned and occupied by merchant Anthony Stewart, owner of the ill-fated PEGGY STEWART, which was burned after Stewart paid duty on cargo arriving from England that included taxable tea. In the 19th and 20th centuries, the dwelling was owned by renowned Annapolitans Charles S. Welch, Georgiana Bailliere, and Judge Ridgely P. Melvin.




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