Photo credit: Henry Naylor , 06/1984

Property Name: Turner-White Casket Company Building
Date Listed: 1/26/1995
Inventory No.: B-2332
Location: 509-511, Lombard St., W., Baltimore, Baltimore City

Description: The Turner-White Casket Co. Building at 509-511 West Lombard Street is a six-story loft building constructed in 1893, located on the south side of West Lombard Street between Paca and Greene Streets in downtown Baltimore. The building reflects the influence of the Romanesque style in its façade organization and detailing, incorporating brick, stone, and cast iron elements. It is two bays wide and six stories high with a full basement. Five stories are organized in two arches which serve to diminish the height. Major cast iron elements appear on the first floor façade. Each of the bays is divided into three recesses by projecting piers decorated with engaged columns of the Composite order. These columns are repeated on the floors above. The recesses are filled with sheet glass windows and there is a door in one section of each bay. Over this area is a stone entablature topped by dentil molding. Stone lions’ heads are located at either end, slightly above the entablature. From this point rise the two flat brick arches which extend up through the fifth floor level. The variety of window treatments and the arrangement of the sixth floor fenestration break up the plan. Originally constructed as a factory with street level display rooms, the building has recently been rehabilitated, and retains a high degree of architectural integrity. The storefront retains its important cast-iron elements, and the upper floors are essentially unchanged.

Significance: The Turner-White Casket Co. Building is significant as representing a cast iron storefront on a multistory loft building. The structure was built in 1893 by Elias Rosenbaum as a speculative venture. The first tenants were Burrough Brothers Manufacturing Co., makers of "medicinal extracts" who occupied this building from 1896 until 1915, purchasing the structure from Rosenbaum in 1898. The next tenants were August Maag, manufacturers of bakers’, confectioners’, and ice cream makers’ tools and utensils, who moved there in 1917. They remained until 1930. The following year, the Turner-White Casket Company purchased the property and continued to occupy it until 1965. In 1968, it was sold to the University of Maryland.




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